Pets travelling abroad (as of 1st March 2019)

With Brexit on the horizon some changes may be coming to how we take our pet cats and dogs abroad. Under the pet travel scheme for travel to and from the European Union pets needed a working microchip, a current rabies vaccination, a pet passport and a tapeworming treatment administered 24 – 120 hours prior to re-entry.

Following the exit of the UK from the European Union this arrangement may be subject to change.

One outcome may be that the UK is allowed to continue to participate in the pet travel scheme and continue using the pet passport scheme.

If we no longer use the pet passport scheme then one of two outcomes possible is that the UK becomes what is known as a listed or unlisted country.

Listed countries require: a working microchip, current rabies vaccination, tapeworm treatment administration and health check within the ten days prior to crossing a border.

Unlisted countries require: a working microchip, current rabies vaccination, tapeworm treatment administration, a health check within the ten days prior to crossing a border, and a rabies blood test taken at least 30 days after rabies vaccination and a minimum of three months prior to the date of travel.

Unlisted status would require 3-4 months planning prior to travel and if the UK become unlisted could cause significant disruption to travel plans. Therefore, if travel with a pet must be guaranteed prior to a decision being reached on pet transport then it is recommended to take precautions and plan for unlisted status.

We recommend discussing future travel plans with one of our veterinary surgeons who can advise you best on what requirements may or may not be required.

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Seb Griffin

Seb Griffin

I graduated from The Royal Veterinary College in 2015 with honours and started work in small animal practice. In my first job I spent time working with charities including the RSPCA, The Blue Cross and Cats Protection League. I have two cats myself and my passion in practice is feline medicine.
Seb Griffin

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